Can neural tension cause shin pain?

Hi Lisa, my daughter is 12. She has been dancing since she was 3. She is having pain over her right shin but only when she does certain exercises ñ for example putting her nose to her knee. It is not hurting her during other exercises or all the time. It doesnít sound to me like shin splints. Could it be that or is there something else you can think of that could be causing this pain. She is auditioning for vocational school shortly so would appreciate a speedy answer. Thanks. Jenni
Dear Jenni
Thanks so much for your question, and you are right to question whether it is ìShin splintsî as it certainly does not sound like itÖ
Many people unfortunately regard any kind of shin pain under the umbrella term of ìShin Splintsî. Shin pain that occurs with an increase in jumping or walking is usually one of 3 different diagnoses ñ Anterior Compartment Syndrome, Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome, or Tibial Stress Fractures, however I do not feel that she has any of these!
However, shin pain when stretching can be happening for an entirely different reason. This is more likely to be due to Neural Tension. This is where the normal sliding of the nerves down into the leg is limited for some reason and a pulling sensation is felt down in the lower leg when talking it into a front or side mount, or a forward bend. Often students with this find it hard to get an actual hamstring stretch, as the nerve tension gets in the way.
The way that I would check if this is the case for your daughter is to get her to lie on her back, and take the leg up into a front mount with the foot relaxed. Then repeat the movement with the foot flexed. Check to see if the range of these two tests is similar, or if the one with the foot flexed is much tighter. This may even bring on her shin pain.
Next, with the leg still lifted up to its full range, get her to circle her ankle slowly to see if she can bring the pain on again. If she can, then I would assume that it is a fascial or nerve tension issue.
Does she already have the Front Splits Fast Program? If she does, I would definitely recommend the Gluteus Medius releases, and the foot and ankle massage section as well as any other parts of the program that feel restricted for her. This may even include some of the upper back exercises! Tension at any point along the back line, or down the outside of the leg may result in this strange pulling pain that she is experiencing.
If she does not have the program, I would highly recommend it, or at least please try the technique demonstrated in the following video to see if changes her symptoms at all.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxpbQLHuJg8
I do hope that helps, and I look forward to hearing from you!
Kindest Regards,
Lisa Howell

Hi Lisa, my daughter is 12. She has been dancing since she was 3. She is having pain over her right shin but only when she does certain exercises – for example putting her nose to her knee. It is not hurting her during other exercises or all the time. It doesn’t sound to me like shin splints. Could it be that or is there something else you can think of that could be causing this pain. She is auditioning for vocational school shortly so would appreciate a speedy answer. Thanks. Jenni

Dear Jenni,

Thanks so much for your question, and you are right to question whether it is “Shin splints” as it certainly does not sound like it.

Many people unfortunately regard any kind of shin pain under the umbrella term of “Shin Splints”. Shin pain that occurs with an increase in jumping or walking is usually one of 3 different diagnoses – Anterior Compartment Syndrome, Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome, or Tibial Stress Fractures, however I do not feel that she has any of these!

However, shin pain when stretching can be happening for an entirely different reason. This is more likely to be due to Neural Tension. This is where the normal sliding of the nerves down into the leg is limited for some reason and a pulling sensation is felt down in the lower leg when talking it into a front or side mount, or a forward bend. Often students with this find it hard to get an actual hamstring stretch, as the nerve tension gets in the way.

The way that I would check if this is the case for your daughter is to get her to lie on her back, and take the leg up into a front mount with the foot relaxed. Then repeat the movement with the foot flexed. Check to see if the range of these two tests is similar, or if the one with the foot flexed is much tighter. This may even bring on her shin pain.

Next, with the leg still lifted up to its full range, get her to circle her ankle slowly to see if she can bring the pain on again. If she can, then I would assume that it is a fascial or nerve tension issue.

Does she already have the Front Splits Fast Program? If she does, I would definitely recommend the Gluteus Medius releases, and the foot and ankle massage section as well as any other parts of the program that feel restricted for her. This may even include some of the upper back exercises! Tension at any point along the back line, or down the outside of the leg may result in this strange pulling pain that she is experiencing.

If she does not have the program, I would highly recommend it, or at least please try the technique demonstrated in the following video to see if changes her symptoms at all.

I do hope that helps, and I look forward to hearing from you!

Kindest Regards,

Lisa Howell

One Response to “Can neural tension cause shin pain?”

  1. Kirsty Says:

    Wow! This is unbelievable I can’t wait to share this with my ballet students and experience this for myself! I’m looking forward to receiving the full e-book

    Kirsty

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